Episode 93: Moldable Plastic is the Stuff of Awesome

The Gals are back and talking about moldable plastic and all of its amazing and fun applications. We have pictures and links o’ plenty for you but first we have an announcement! Two Artsy Gals started a new Patreon account. If you are unfamiliar with Patreon it is a platform which allows people to support projects they are interested in on a smaller scale and more consistent basis than larger crowd sourcing services.

By offering you the opportunity to sponsor Two Artsy Gals with monthly donations from as low as $5 to $45, we hope to maintain a small monthly operating budget that will allow us to cover expenses as they come up, rather than having to do big fund raisers once or twice a year. To learn more about this opportunity, go have a look at our Patreon page by clicking here.

To listen to this week’s episode click here.

Have a look at the Pintrest board for this episode here.

As Katie explains in the beginning of the show, the idea for this episode came about when she was looking for a product she used for jewelry making in the 90’s called Friendly Plastic. She searched for it last year and was able to find the little plastic sheets of it then but for a price that about made her faint. It was during that search that she discovered moldable plastics and when looking for friendly plastic today just so you all would know what she is talking about, Katie discovered that the sheets have been discontinued and the company has moved to plastic beads similar to the ones The Gals talk about today.  At any rate, Katie wanted you to see what they old stuff looked like so here is a picture of that.

1

 

 

 

 

 

The Gals used Instamorph but there are no fewer than eight other brands available on the market. Check out Instamporph’s site here, and if you are interested in other options have a look at this Amazon search.

This is what the Instamorph moldable plastic and color packets look like.

This is what the Instamorph moldable plastic and color packets look like.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

They are tiny little beads of plastic you drop into hot water (140-150 degrees).

They are tiny little beads of plastic you drop into hot water (140-150 degrees).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

They become clear almost immediately after being submerged but you will need to wait about two minutes before removing the blob of plastic (you can see the tiny color beads in this batch).

They become clear almost immediately after being submerged but you will need to wait about two minutes before removing the blob of plastic (you can see the tiny color beads in this batch).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here you can see Loni kneading the color into the softened plastic before shaping.

Here you can see Loni kneading the color into the softened plastic before shaping.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And this is the cute little heart she made.

And this is the cute little heart she made.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Katie used an old mold she made years ago when she use to make jewelry out of epoxy resin clay. You can see the softened plastic in the mold here.

Katie used an old mold she made years ago when she use to make jewelry out of epoxy resin clay. You can see the softened plastic in the mold here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are the plastic cameos she made. The first is solid white, it is difficult to see detail in the image, but it did pick up the full detail from the mold. The second is a single coat of gold acrylic paint and the third image is the two toned cameo Katie tried. She thinks these results are very promising and plans to do more serious experimenting with this product and a new style of cameo.

9 10 11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There were a couple of blobs left so Katie made a brush rest for the edge of the cup she uses to rinse her paint brushes.

12 13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a fun and exciting product and The Gals can’t wait to hear from you all about what you do with it once you get your hands on some (and we know you will). Share your experiences with Loni and Katie by emailing twoartsygals@gmail.com OR by leaving them a message on their voicemail line at 503-395-7190. You can also contact them and follow what they are up to on our social media accounts! We are on FB, Instagram, Twitter, and Pintrest. Subscribe to the show on iTunes, Stitcher, and the PodOmatic apps to get fresh episodes in your ear holes as soon as they are released.

Next week The Gals will be back to talk about Victorian Hairwork, so until then… go make some cool shit, yo!

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Two Artsy Gals Podcast Show Notes and Links and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s